A Week of Quilting

I haven’t posted for a while.  I guess this blog, like a lot of my crafting, slows down over the summer. Sorry.

It is fully autumn in Quebec.  Pottery class has started up again, and I’m itching to quilt and sew and craft and cook and make.

I just took a week off work and loaded a car FULL of sewing supplies and drove up to the cottage for a week.  I went up with my sister, then my parents joined me for a couple nights.  My grandparents came up for a day trip and then D. for a few days.

An itty-bitty turtle crawled around on the lawn for a visit too.

The weather was grey and wet for the first few days, then sunny, clear and beautiful the last few.

They grey weather and piles of sewing supplies allowed me to finish not one, but two (!!) quilt tops.

And I sewed a new curtain for the kitchen window.

The one that was there was hideous! Unfortunately I don’t have photos, but it was made of something synthetic, made to look something like lace with peaches on blue background.  I used some lovely fabric I bought at Purl Soho nearly three years ago.  That’s before I was really sewing and didn’t really know what to do with it.

I’ve always thought it would be a nice fabric for small curtains (these were a foot long), so it was a perfect fit.

I thought I had finished my nine-patch quilt months ago, but there was something about the border that bother me.

This is what it looked like:

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My friend Anie helped me figure out the problem with it was I didn’t like the way the stacked coin border melted into the flowery white fabric.  Actually I didn’t like the stacked coin border at all.

I tore out the border and at the cottage I fixed it.

(sorry for the washed out photos… I can’t seem to find any other place to hang this big quilt to take a picture of it where the colours aren’t quite so pale)

Final measurements are 94″ by 86″.  I’ve decided to get this one professionally quilted.  I just don’t like it enough to spend the hours doing it myself.

This will be the background fabric (which I love):

I also finished my pin-wheel quilt at the cottage.

I bought the fabric for this one in San-Francisco on a trip with D. in late April.

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I purchased without planning out the quilt first, so I was missing a few fat quarters when it came time to sew.  I added some fabric from my stash which worked out well.

Final measurements are 70″ x 70″ .

Overall I’m really pleased with this one.

There is a patch with a lot of green in the middle.  I messed up the direction of a few blocks when I was sewing them in a row.

It was worse, but I did some quilting surgery (take out two blocks in the middle and sew them back in) to help with the problem.  It’s not perfect but it doesn’t bother me too much.

I know what I’ll do for the back but need to buy some fabric.

That leaves me with only one Quilting WIP.  And It’s nearly done too!

I’m happy to have an almost clean quilting slate to start the Fall off with.

Time to buy more fabric.

NOTE: I’m linking up to crazy mom quilts‘ Finish It Up Fridays.  I love the linking party.  It’s a strong source of inspiration to get stuff done.  And to blog about it.

-marika

One Way to Make a Nine-Patch Block

Over the Christmas holidays I went to my parents place for a few days.  I packed a few (nine) fat quarters and decided to haul out my mom’s machine start making a new quilt top.

At first, I planned to go to a quilt shop nearby to buy enough fabric to finish a project.  Unfortunately the store was closed for two weeks.

But that didn’t stop me.  I started making a nine-patch quilt using the fabric I did have.

The plan is to make a quilt that looks something like this. But much bigger, with different colours, and a wider boarder.

The more I quilting I do, the more I realize it is all about shortcuts.  That may make me a lazy quilter, but means I generally finish projects rather than get annoyed or tired of them.

Here are the shortcuts I took in making my nine-patch block.  I have no idea if this is how most people make nine-patches, but as I’ve learned to quilt on youtube, a couple books, and by asking a lot of pesky questions to nice ladies in Cape Breton, I’m pretty happy I figured this out by myself.

First I cut strips (2.5″ by 10″) and (2.5″) squares.

For any given square I would pick two strips.

Sew. Press seams flat.  In some quits you press seams to one side or another.  Generally you always press towards the darker fabric (so you don’t see it through a light fabric).  Having both layers of the seam to one side can make it easier when it comes to hand quilting, as you want to have to push your needle through the least amound of fabric (resistance) as possible.

Once the 10″ strips are sewn together, cut into four 2.5″ sections.

Arrange three sections horizontally so the colours alternate.  The fourth section is placed vertically.  Pick one of the 2.5″ squares to complete the nine-patch.

Depending what square you use to complete the block, the fabric in the centre will change. Like so:

I liked this one, so I sewed the three sections on the left together, as well as the section on the right to the square.

One more seam to go:

With the nine fat quarters I had, I made 54 blocks.  I’m going to need 90.  I ordered the rest of the fabric I need for this quilt and it arrived this weekend.

I opted for a jelly roll rather than more fat quarters so I would have a greater variety of fabrics.  The other fabrics from bottom to top will be for the batting, sashing, borders, and binding.

Once I finish machine-quilting (or need a break from quilting) my stacked coins quilt I started in May, I’ll work on this one.  I’m trying very hard not to have too many WIP on the go at once.

Thanks for stopping by.

-marika